What’s the Tee?

It’s been a while since we’ve had a catch up on everything that’s going to happen in fashion so I’m excited to share with you some things that have been happening – everything from the trends for autumn as we go back to school/ college, to how fashion has been helping to stop the spread… Read more »

by TshequaWilliams 4 weeks ago

It’s been a while since we’ve had a catch up on everything that’s going to happen in fashion so I’m excited to share with you some things that have been happening – everything from the trends for autumn as we go back to school/ college, to how fashion has been helping to stop the spread of the virus.

TRANSITIONAL WARDROBE

As the weather begins to change with autumn finally on its way, we’re faced with the annual challenge of the transitional wardrobe. Finding the difficult balance between dressing for crisp mornings, sunny afternoons and drizzly evenings all lies in the practicality of layering. A simple way to approach this is to take a summer evening outfit such as jeans or loose trousers with a light camisole or cotton tee and adding pieces from your autumn/ winter wardrobe. Pairing such outfits with trainers and a jacket or jumper means you can go about your day, suitably adjusting to the weather. As it starts to get a bit colder, layering a cardigan or jumper with a longer trench or blazer-style coat and swapping out trainers for boots will give you more protection from the elements, while still allowing you to peel off a layer when you go into a heated building.

AUTUMN/ WINTER 20 TRENDS

When I attended London Fashion Week back in January (oh how times have changed since then!), one thing that stood out to me about the AW 20 trends was the continued use of heavy textures, boxy cuts and rich colours, setting almost a tone of battle this autumn – whether that be of the elements or the pandemic. In my eyes, AW 20 is designed heavily around practicality, with long sturdy coats, leather and thick denim as the foundations, complemented and juxtaposed by more delicate knitwear and check patterns. For formal party wear, it’s the bigger the better as tulle dresses and puffy sleeves get their moment.

MAKING MASKS WORK

Unless you’re exempt from wearing one, in most places it is now expected that you wear a face covering/ mask in crowded public places including shops. I’m sure no one particularly likes wearing one, but if there’s anything you can actively do to reduce the risk of spreading the virus, I think it is worth it. I personally found disposable masks really uncomfortable to wear after a short while, so I have invested in a few reusable masks which are so much better for me. Shopping around on websites like Etsy for reusable masks means you’re reducing your environmental impact as you can simply just pop them in the washing machine, replace your filter and you’re ready to go again! The best part is that there are hundreds of different designs, allowing you to coordinate them to your outfit and feel slightly cuter wearing one.

DIGITAL FASHION WEEK

While we’re on the subject of how strange 2020 has been – fashion weeks around the world have been revolutionised to fit into a socially distanced world, including having a mostly digital schedule. London Fashion Week, running from the 17th to 22nd September, has most designers’ shows being displayed online. Its gender-neutral showcase hosts around 80 designers and, by going online, makes the runways accessible to everyone to enjoy from home. All digital content can be found at londonfashionweek.co.uk

FASHION IN THE WAKE OF BLACK LIVES MATTER

I couldn’t write this article without addressing how the fashion industry is a major part of the importance of Black Lives Matter. When we’re talking about the ingrained racism in society, the industry has flaws in every level. It is very easy to see how diversity is a massive issue – everything from the models that walk the runways, all the behind-the scene staff and the lack of inclusivity in advertising/ media, people of colour are outnumbered and aren’t always given equal opportunities to work in their sector. The problem extends even into the simplest things, such as how some models have shared stories of photoshoots where they’re expected to do their own hair and makeup as the hair and makeup artists hired aren’t equipped to work on them. The industry (and the rest of the world) must make changes on every level, employing people of colour, making it a space that welcomes, encourages and represents everyone, and celebrates the talents of people of colour.