Effects of Fashion Standards in Society

From fashion runways to photoshoots, we always tend to see the same kind of people that are favoured in society… thin, white, and conventionally attractive people. Though recently there are brands who are looking to be more inclusive and actually attempt to represent the diversities seen in the world, the majority of the population on… Read more »

by Anonymous 1 month ago

From fashion runways to photoshoots, we always tend to see the same kind of people that are favoured in society… thin, white, and conventionally attractive people. Though recently there are brands who are looking to be more inclusive and actually attempt to represent the diversities seen in the world, the majority of the population on the globe (and still to this day) have grown up or are growing up with these ‘ideals’ of being valued on our thinness, whiteness and attractiveness (if you fancy reading more about how this ideal affects us read Florence Given’s book called Women don’t owe you pretty!). The fashion industry influences the culture in how we perceive features of our bodies and faces, through the use of using models which tend to be of one race, one body shape, and have facial features which are desired. Many girls grow up with the notion to be ‘like these models’ and will aspire to change their appearance in order to meet the standards that have been set. These ideals are so harmful to individuals and large portions of society who don’t fit into these categories that are favoured. Especially when we start to look at examples of how society puts different levels of pressure on different groups. Features that are associated with being white such as straight hair are favoured and desired in society, but for black people there are different pressures on them to change their natural hair and will even be punished or even rejected in the workplace for being ‘unprofessional’. My own experiences will be very different to those of black, Asian, disabled and all minority groups as I am a white individual, many of these pressures I will never experience purely due to my skin colour. As a society we can do so much better. Especially to those who are marginalized. Whilst I cannot be the voice for all, maybe you can relate to feelings of not feeling valuable and just feeling worthless because you don’t look good one day or experience situations in where people will treat you very differently though seems on the surface as nice… is usually always for other negative intentions. We are all affected differently by these pressures, and we need to change narratives and I believe it starts in the fashion industry. When brands have a group of models which is diverse and representative of society, pressures on people to appear feminine or appear masculine enough, will fade away and truly make way for happiness in society.