A very student Christmas

Christmas is the most joyful time of the year, or it’s supposed to be. It often entails a considerable deal of travel, stress, and constant worry for us students. It can be a source of extreme misery for those of us trapped in the tumultuous world of student housing. But I’ve decided that this year it won’t be. My flatmates, Adelaide and… Read more »

by Matt Newman 4 months ago

Christmas is the most joyful time of the year, or it’s supposed to be. It often entails a considerable deal of travel, stress, and constant worry for us students. It can be a source of extreme misery for those of us trapped in the tumultuous world of student housing. But I’ve decided that this year it won’t be.

My flatmates, Adelaide and George, are kind, but like most people, they have their own flaws. Adelaide often suffers from grandiose ideas, and frequently flings her wealth in the faces of others, something that should not be done at a season of giving. George, on the other hand, is the polar opposite; he is riddled with insecurity and poor self-esteem. I consider myself ordinary, but I can be a bit eccentric.

So, it was going to take a miracle to have an enjoyable Christmas confined to our small flat.

Adelaide, recently returned from Waitrose, barges into my room with Christmas decorations swinging from her body. ‘It’s time to put up that tree you brought last week,’ she announces. She stands over me impatiently.

I tear myself away from favourite book and sigh. I grab the box with the baubles neatly wrapped inside.

Then George stumbles in. ‘I’m not sure whether we should put the star on top or the angel,’ he whispers, mostly to himself.

‘Pick the one you think looks best,’ I say, smiling reassuringly at George.

He flashes a smile at me before returning to his room to retrieve the topper.

I had been distracted by George so only now noticed that Adelaide was adorning the tree with tinsel in a garish manner.

‘Please, stop what you are doing. That looks awful, Ade,’ I exclaim.

‘What? Why? They’re only decorations. Plus, I bought this expensive tinsel, so it’ll look wonderful,’ she replies confidently.

‘Ade, Christmas isn’t all about you or money. It’s a time of giving and spreading happiness. I don’t appreciate you taking over the tree like this,’ I reply, slightly agitated.

Adelaide looks down and sighs heavily. ‘You’re right,’ she says. ‘It’s just… it’s been so difficult not having my family with me this Christmas. They… I can’t go home this year.’

George returns with the star and immediately tries to console Adelaide who has started crying. ‘Hey, it’s all right. We all get upset sometimes,’ he says soothingly. ‘We need to stick together and make this a really merry Christmas, yeah?’

We both nod in response.

After a short time, we all stand to continue working on the tree. George hands me the star, which he has proudly chosen to be the centrepiece of our tree. I place the star at the top and then I step back to admire our work. I never could have imagined that the three of us would be able to work together to create something so lovely.

George disappears and comes back in a few minutes later with some hot chocolate.

‘You’ve done an incredible job with this hot chocolate, George. Delicious!’ I exclaim.

‘Thank you,’ he replies. ‘The tree looks amazing. Well done guys!’

We continue to stand admiring the tree whilst drinking our warm beverages.

I think about all the wonderful things that makes Christmas so delightful. It may not have been your typical Christmas with family and loved ones, but we gave it our all. And it turned out to be a very student Christmas after all.