Timetabling Tips

If you’re anything like me, you love a good daily schedule. The same can be said for my revision timetabling; I like to know in advance what I plan to revise, when, and how. This is something that I know holds many people back from revising, as they simply don’t know where to begin, and… Read more »

by RosieWedge 9 months ago

If you’re anything like me, you love a good daily schedule. The same can be said for my revision timetabling; I like to know in advance what I plan to revise, when, and how. This is something that I know holds many people back from revising, as they simply don’t know where to begin, and so I thought I’d share some timetabling tips that will help you organise your studying sessions, and boost productivity.

Firstly, plan on paper, not on your computer. My main reason for saying this is that it’s far easier to procrastinate and edit your timetable to avoid doing things if all it takes is a few simple keyboard clicks. However, if it’s down on paper, you’re less likely to postpone things at the cost of scribbling out the writing already on your timetable. You can reinforce this by making your timetable colour-coded and pretty, so you’re even more averse to crossing things out and ruining your aesthetic creation.

Next, really consider your strengths and weaknesses within each subject, or module, and prioritise your weaknesses. If you see that you’re planning to revise something you are already confident on, you’re more likely to pass on it, and embark on a Netflix-binge instead. So, prioritise your weaker areas to ensure the “oh heck! I better revise that!” mental mode gets activated to encourage you.

Another big thing that I cannot stress enough is that there is no point revising really early or really late in the day if it doesn’t suit you. Some people are night owls, others are early risers. I personally can revise really well at 8am, but as soon as it hits 6pm, I’m done for the day. Other people can’t think straight until 4pm, but can keep going until 10pm. I don’t recommend pulling all-nighters, or revising at 2am in the morning, but don’t feel bad about tailoring a timetable to fit your optimum working times!