Sexual Assault and Violence Awareness Week – Consent

The 4th – 10th February marked Sexual Abuse and Violence Awareness Week where the focus was #ITSNOTOK. Sexual abuse and violence come in many different forms, can happen at any age, could happen to anyone regardless of gender, ethnicity or class and will impact everyone differently. It’s not okay that anyone should have to go… Read more »

by sl_carla 2 years ago

The 4th – 10th February marked Sexual Abuse and Violence Awareness Week where the focus was #ITSNOTOK. Sexual abuse and violence come in many different forms, can happen at any age, could happen to anyone regardless of gender, ethnicity or class and will impact everyone differently. It’s not okay that anyone should have to go through this and if they did, it is not okay that many victims are left scared, afraid and feeling alone. To raise awareness, we have focused on the topic of consent. There is also a list of numbers on the next page to help if you are going through anything but are not sure who to contact for support.

The definition of consent is to give full permission/ agreement to take part in a sexual activity. Sometimes there can be confusion over consent and whether it is valid or not. There should never be uncertainty in whether consent is given or not. 

Here are some rules that everyone should know for clarity:

  • The legal age of consent is 16 in the UK or 18 if the other person is in a position of authority. 

  • Consent should be confidently given because you feel comfortable to participate without pressure from your partner.

  • You cannot give consent if you are under the influence of drugs or alcohol, are unconscious or have certain mental disabilities. 

  • At any point you feel uncomfortable and don’t want to continue, you can change your mind and stop. This applies to all times, even if you’ve done it before. 

  • You should be fully knowledgeable about what is involved, including the use of contraceptives/ condoms. If this changes without your knowledge, then it is not consensual. 

  • You should be comfortable with what is involved. Only do things that you want to do and not that you’re expected to do. 

  • Saying yes to one thing does not mean you have given permission for anything else. 


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